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goodenoughcaring.com is an arena for the discussion of  issues of interest to parents, foster parents, residential child care workers, counsellors, youth support workers, social workers, teachers, mentors, social pedagogues,  educateurs  and to young people who are, and adults who have been, in care. If you are interested in, or involved in the care,upbringing and education of  children and young people or in the nurturing of children and young people who are unable to live with their own families  goodenoughcaring.com  is a site for you. The website welcomes  thoughtful views – personal, practical or theoretical –  about the care of children and young people.  If you want to comment about  child care or about goodenoughcaring.com  then  e mail:  goodenoughcaring@icloud.com

The goodenoughcaring.com site is archived at the British Library.

The goodenoughcaring journal is an online publication which invites anyone wishing to publish papers and articles about  parenting, nurture, child care work and related fields or those wishing to write about their child care experiences to submit as e mail attachments  papers or articles for publication to the editors at goodenoughcaring@icloud.com.

The members of the editorial group are Cynthia Cross, Evelyn Daniel, Siobain Degregorio, Jeremy Millar, Jane Kenny, Ariola Vishnja, Mark Smith, John Stein and Charles Sharpe. The current issue was published online on 18th, June, 2014 and  the next issue will be published on December 15th,  2014. The Journal index can be found at http://www.goodenoughcaring.com/the-journal/

Something to consider : Adam Phillips on teaching

‘The only reason to go to school, that I can see, is to make friends whom you love and like. If you’re lucky, you find something that really interests you. You’ve got to learn to read and write and basic numeracy and so on, but, other than that, it’s absolutely pointless to teach children things that they’re not interested in. The education system needs to factor that in. I remember one of my daughter’s teachers saying to me, “She only works at the subjects she’s interested in.” I was thinking, Great! That would be the point. You go to school, and teachers offer you the things they think are good, but you choose them. It’s always true that the student chooses the teacher.’

This is an extract from  Sameer Padania’s 2010 interview with the psychoanalyst and essayist Adam Phillips for Bomb Magazine. The full text of the interview can be found at   http://bombmagazine.org/article/3623/adam-phillips

 

Issue 20 of the goodenoughcaring Journal is now online

The final scheduled issue of the goodenoughcaring Journal is now online. Articles submitted or commissioned in the future will continue to be published but regular readers will we relieved to know that after the next one they will know longer have to read the promotional email we send out to you every six months.
This issue is an interesting and informative one, a challenging one, a controversial one and perhaps a disturbing one. We would welcome and encourage your comments on any of the articles.

In this issue :-
Dr. Elaine Arnold tells of the significance education held for immigrants to the United Kingdom from the Caribbean while Margaret Hughes recollects the City of Birmingham’s efforts to meet the social and educational needs of immigrants from the Indian sub-continent and elsewhere in the 1950s,60s,70s and 80s.
Noel Howard discusses religion, spirituality and the importance of place in social care. Michael J Marlowe considers how relationships may be made with children who are difficult to reach and Maurice Fenton proposes and develops a concept of ‘relationship based self-care.’
Alex Russon reflects on relocating with his young family from the midlands of England to the north-east of Scotland and Justin Frost reviews three feature films which deal with divorce, parenting and family break up.
Cynthia Cross examines the issues which can lead to a cycle of disruption in residential child care. Maurice Fenton proposes and develops the concept of ‘relationship based self-care.’ In a further article he contemplates the notion of ‘vicarious confidence’ in the care of children and young people and Simon Blades reviews Maurice’s latest book ‘The Stolen Child’.
Colin Maginn proposes that we can do better than good enough caring. John Stein recalls how times have changed in child and youth care. In a second article Elaine Arnold argues that aspects of attachment theory remain significant throughout life.
Mark Smith has written a startling, challenging and important article on the prosecution of those accused of child sexual abuse.
In his editorial Charles Sharpe has attempts a brief explanation of what those who founded the Journal believed goodenoughcaring to be and with it he provides a brief history of the goodenoughcaring Journal.

We hope you find something to interest you in this issue. We’d like to thank all the people who have written for us and helped to built up this superb archive about children growing up and about the adults who care for them and educate them. Each piece of writing is interesting and thought provoking. The archive will remain open for everyone who is interested in the nurturing of children. News items will continue to appear on the home page and occasional articles will be published when they are submitted.
Finally we would like to thank the hundreds of thousands of people who visit and read the Journal. It is good to be part of this community.

Not long now – the  20th goodenoughcaring Journal goes online tomorrow

Issue 20 is published online tomorrow

Elaine Arnold writes about the significance education had for immigrants to the United Kingdom from the Caribbean while Margaret Hughes recollects the City of Birmingham’s efforts to meet the social and educational needs of immigrants from the Indian sub-continent in the 1950s,60s,70s and 80s.

Noel Howard considers religion, spirituality and the importance of place in social care. Michael J Marlowe examines the making of relationships with children who are difficult to reach and Maurice Fenton proposes and develops the concept of ‘relationship based self-care.’

Alex Russon considers the implications of relocating a family to another region and Justin Frost reviews three feature films which deal with divorce and the break up of the family.

Cynthia Cross considers how to break the cycle of disruption which exists in residential child care.

In a further article Maurice Fenton contemplates ‘vicarious confidence’ in the care of children and young people and Simon Blades reviews Maurice’s latest book  ‘The Stolen Child’.

Colin Maginn proposes that we can do better than good enough caring and in response Charles Sharpe writes briefly about the history of the goodenoughcaring Journal and the idea of good-enough caring.

John Stein thinks about how times have changed in child and youth care. In another article Elaine Arnold argues that aspects of attachment theory remain significant throughout life. Mark Smith provides a challenging article on the prosecution of those accused of child sexual abuse

 

The goodenoughcaring bake off : more ingredients in the mixing bowl for issue 20

In addition to the articles already announced by Colin Maginn, Michael J Marlowe, Alex Russon, Justin Frost, Mark Smith, Simon Blades and John Stein we are delighted to say we have received further pieces by Margaret Hughes, Noel Howard and Maurice Fenton. Others are in the pipeline. More details will appear on this page in a few days time.

 

The next Limbus lecture

Farhad Dalai has written to us with details of the next year’s first Limbus lecture on Saturday, February 25th, 2017.

The lecture Viewing Learning Disabilities Psychotherapy through an Attachment Lens:
Theoretical Perspectives & Practical Strategies will be given by Kelly Camilleri & Kathy McKay

The event will take place between 10.30am to 1pm  in Studio 3, The Space, Dartington Hall. The cost of entrance is £20.

If you are interested you can book a place online at limbus.org.uk or you can come and pay at the door.

 

Abstract :  Viewing Learning Disabilities Psychotherapy through an Attachment Lens:
Theoretical Perspectives & Practical Strategies

This talk aims to explore themes around working therapeutically with people who live with labels of intellectual disability, autism and acquired brain injury. What are the psychological sequelae of being born with or acquiring a disability in terms of attachment and early relations? How might therapy need to be adapted to meet individual cognitive or sensory needs? What is the role of trauma in psychological distress and how might this manifest differently in people with these labels? How is power perceived and played out in our systems of care? The talk aims to provide a psychological understanding from a variety of perspectives, with special consideration for the use of Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy (DDP) for this group and their systems. Within the context of a short term, goal orientated therapy world how can we provide meaningful support which is individually tailored?

Dr Kelly Camilleri is an independent Consultant Clinical Psychologist. She qualified 19 years ago from Birmingham University and has since worked with children and adults with learning difficulty, autism, and acquired disability. Kelly has worked in a variety of sectors including the NHS, charity and the private sector. She is particularly interested in the role of attachment and trauma for the individual and their systems. Kelly is a keen proponent on the use of DDP for this group which she feels enables a dual approach focusing both on peoples internal and external worlds. She is on the Division of Clinical Psychology Southwest Committee and is the coordinator for local Psychology Against Austerity Group.

Dr Kathy McKay is a Clinical Psychologist who has worked in Learning Disability Services in the NHS since qualifying in 1995. She has also worked in Independent Practice since 2007. Settings have included community Learning Disability teams, In-patient Units and a Secure Forensic Unit. She has also worked in a CAMHS Service in a secure childrens home, and currently provides regular input into a Local Authority Family Centre to support them in taking into account a parents learning needs in their assessment and intervention processes. Kathy has provided training on attachment and trauma in learning disabilities, and further on creating attachment friendly environments in a number of the aforementioned settings. Like Kelly, Kathy has completed training in DDP, which was a driver for this area of work.

Less than a month away – issue 20 of the goodenoughcaring Journal goes online on December 15th.

On December 15th, 2016, the new issue of the goodenoughcaring Journal will go online.  Articles by Colin Maginn, Michael J Marlowe, Alex Russon, Justin Frost, Mark Smith, Simon Blades and John Stein are already confirmed. A similar number are in the pipeline and will be confirmed with more details in the coming days.

The goodenoughcaring Journal 20 : a very special issue

On December 15th, 2016,  issue 20 of the goodenoughcaring Journal goes online. It is a special issue because it will as ever be full of original articles about aspects of childhood, but also because it will be the last scheduled issue of the Journal. New articles will continue to be posted on the Journal site as and when they are submitted, and of course all the articles from all previous the issues of the goodenoughcaring Journal will continue to be available online as an archive available to all readers.  Submissions for the December issue are still welcome and will be accepted up to December 8th.

Details of the articles already submitted for this next issue will appear on this page in the next few days.

Limbus lecture : The Present Moment: cultivating embodied attunement and empathy

 

Farhad Dalal has written to us about our the next Limbus Lecture at Studio 3,The Space, Dartington Hall on November 12th, which will be presented by Margaret Lansdale. The theme of lecture is ‘The Present Moment – Cultivating embodied attunement and empathy’

It starts at 10.30 and will finish at 1pm. The cost is £20. It is possible to book online at limbus.org.uk or come and pay at the door.

If you intend to pay at the door, please arrive well before 10.30 to avoid hold ups.

Abstract:

This talk will explore how we may work more effectively in the here and now, integrating somatic, emotional and mental processes within the therapeutic process. This includes a deeper awareness of our own embodied experience and how we engage with the non-verbal forms of communication between client and therapist.

We will explore how to engage with these non-verbal processes in a mindful and compassionate way. We will also enquire into how therapists and clients can cultivate empathic presence, acceptance and equilibrium when working with complex dynamics, deeply rooted conflict or early trauma. Some key practical techniques and strategies for building a safe and supportive therapeutic alliance to help process some deeper trauma or implicit memory held in the body will also be introduced. The talk will draw on current research into the workings of the brain,attachment and emotional regulation, as well as using clinical vignettes to illustrate how these insights may translate into our therapeutic practice.

 

Margaret Landale is an experienced psychotherapist and supervisor. Shehas been a training director at the Chiron Centre for Body Psychotherapy in London and delivers workshops and talks nationwide on subjects such as  somatization, complex trauma and embodied empathy. Having been a meditator for many years, she has become increasingly interested in the integration of mindfulness in psychotherapy and has taught on the ‘mindfulness in individual psychotherapy’ module at the Centre for Mindfulness Research and Practice, Bangor University.

Publications include: ‘Working with psychosomatic distress and developmental trauma’ in: Contemporary Body Psychotherapy – The Chiron

Approach, Linda Hartley ed., Routledge 2009. ‘The use of imagery in body oriented psychotherapy’ in Body Psychotherapy, Tree Staunton ed.,Brunner-Routledge, 2002

Here is the 2017 programme – put the dates in your diary!

Feb 25, Kelly Camilleri & Kathy McKay Reflections on Therapy in the context of labels of disability

May 20, Sally Weintrobe Climate Change and the New Imagination

Sep 16, Paul Zeal Breath, Gender & Dream in a Limited World

Nov 11, Sue Mizen Metaphor Making in the Relational Brain

“The Stolen Child” – a new book by Maurice Fenton

 

the-stolen-child-cover_front

 

The Stolen Child  –   the latest book by Maurice Fenton is now published. It is available on Amazon at

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Stolen-Child-Relationship-Belonging-Compassion/dp/0995550905/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1477224126&sr=8-2&keywords=maurice+fenton

The Stolen Child was Inspired by articles Maurice Fenton published in recent issues of the goodenoughcaring Journal. His book portrays the stolen lives of young people in care and considers the importance of caring for young people in a human, compassionate and professional manner. Drawing on the writings of WB Yeats and Carl Jung and others the author reflects on his own work with children and young people. The Stolen Child will be reviewed in December’s issue of the goodenoughcaring Journal.

A review of Maurice Fenton’s previous book Social Care and Child Welfare in Ireland:  integrating residential care, leaving care and after care can be found  here.